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REVOLUTIONIZING DATA USE TO FEED THE PLANET

Submission type: 
lab
Process - Sponsors
Partner organisation(s) of your project: 
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
PanAfrican Farmers' Organization
Content approach - Topics, title and subtitle
Topic 1: 
Feeding the planet together
Title: 
REVOLUTIONIZING DATA USE TO FEED THE PLANET
Subtitle: 
SOLID FOUNDATIONS FOR NEW FOOD POLICIES ROOTED IN A BOTTOM-UP APPROACH
Content approach - Introduction
Policy background: 

Higher and more volatile food prices, combined with two decades of robust economic growth and urbanization, as well as renewed public and private investment, means that the African agricultural landscape is not the same today as it once was. A bottom-up understanding is key to inform policy-makers on the new agricultural reality in Africa and assess progress. Yet, relevant and accurate data, including core indicators such as cereal yields, are simply a challenge to come by. At the same time, data is in constant evolution and can be harnessed to inform all stakeholders: satellite imagery provides information on weather patterns and soil; and integrated household survey data links geo-referenced plot information to income and spending patterns. This high-level panel will discuss how best to foster and exploit the opportunities the new “Data Revolution” provides for feeding Africa and the planet.

Content approach - Relevance and outcomes
Relevance: 
Since the 2007-2008 world food crisis, food security is back high on the development agenda with renewed public and private investment in agriculture. Fostering agricultural productivity, food security and nutrition are also central to the EU’s 2015-2022 development agenda. This requires a solid understanding of agriculture’s reality on the ground, and thus data and analysis, to establish baselines to track progress, to directly inform agricultural interventions and to shape effective food policies. Yet good quality data is largely unavailable and when it is, the capacity to use and analyze it is often limited. A series of new data collection and compilation technologies and data initiatives, such as the LSMS-ISA household survey data initiative provides new but largely untapped opportunities to address this crippling void. Increased awareness of the existing voids in our knowledge as well as an appreciation of the critical possibilities the data revolution brings is needed. This can concretely contribute to foster a culture of evidence based policymaking and maximally leverage the scarce resources already available. Awareness generation is best achieved through demonstration i.e. demonstrating how clever manipulation of publicly available information can shift policy conversations as well as inform projects and policy interventions. While the dire state of Africa’s food and agricultural information base has been much discussed, the challenge remains enormous and many of the opportunities still largely untapped. It is key to keep this at the forefront of the EDD15 audience’s attention, also in light of the upcoming launch of the Sustainable Development Goals. Speakers will be selected to 1) Illustrate and demonstrate concrete applications 2) Include the different perspectives a. data producers and analysts (private sector IT, statistical offices) b. data users (policy makers, analysts, and private sector and farmers)
Outcome 1: 
ILLUSTRATE HOW GOOD USE OF (AVAILABLE AND NEW) DATA CAN AFFECT THE FOOD POLICY DIALOGUE?
Outcome 2: 
IS MONEY SPENT ON DATA COLLECTION? IS IT MONEY WELL SPENT?
Outcome 3: 
HOW CAN LOCAL CAPACITY TO ANALYZE AND USE AVAILABLE FOOD SECURITY DATA BE ENHANCED IN AFRICA?
Content approach - Story
Story: 
Topic 1: 
Feeding the planet together
Title: 
Are African youth really exiting agriculture en masse?
Subtitle: 
n/a
Author First Name: 
Luc
Author Last Name: 
Christiaensen
Organisation name: 
The World Bank Group
Region: 
Africa
Content approach - Speakers
Speaker(s): 
First name: 
Francisco
Last name: 
Ferreira
Function/Position: 
Chief Economist Africa Region of the World Bank
Nationality: 
First name: 
Pamela
Last name: 
Anderson
Function/Position: 
Director Agriculture, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
First name: 
Theo
Last name: 
de Jager
Function/Position: 
President of the Panafrican Farmers Organisation (PAFO) and President of the Southern African Confederation of Agricultural Unions (SACAU)
First name: 
Akin
Last name: 
Adesina
Function/Position: 
Minister of Agriculture, Nigeria
Nationality: 
First name: 
Stephane
Last name: 
Richard
Function/Position: 
President, Orange
Speaker relevance: 
Drs. Ferreira and Anderson are both influential policymakers, knowledgeable about agriculture in Africa and, policy agenda setters, who identify funding priorities and trade-offs on agriculture and food related issues. The organized farmers in Africa are a key partner in any activity we do on agriculture in the continent and they are themselves data providers. Dr de Jager is both a farmer in South Africa and a leader, having been elected in December 2014 as the President of the Panafrican farmer organisation. He believes innovations in data use is key for farmers future. Policy makers are key users of data and their decisions have a profound influence in the agricultural sector. As illustrated by the changes brought to Nigeria in the agricultural sector, Dr Adesina believes that data r
Interactivity - Moderator
Moderator(s): 
First name: 
Zeinab
Last/Family name: 
Badawi
Function/Position: 
BBC Journalist
Nationality: 
Interactivity - Synopsis/Q&A and polling
Speakers relevance: 
1. In the absence of systematic and good quality data, are policy decisions currently sufficiently grounded in the reality on the ground and is the current balance between understanding the facts on the ground and action in the area of agriculture right? 2. Should we focus more on strengthening traditional data collection methods or does the future lie in new data collection and analysis techniques? Will the data revolution be equivalent to the mobile revolution in Africa and other developing countries? What examples do we have to illustrate the various opinions? 3. Do we have in place transparent mechanisms of data collection and data sharing which can encourage farmers and agribusiness to collaborate? Or is uneven access to modern technologies of data generating asymmetry of power? What regulatory frameworks and PPPs could avoid that? What are the lessons to be learnt from the current state of play of data collection in Africa?
Overall style: 
Considering the diversity of speakers (donors, policy-makers, farmers, technology industry) and the fact that many of them have concrete applications they finance or implement, it will be an inclusive and bottom-up style session. Speakers will also be invited to bring their portable data (e.g. mini-satellite or drone) with them and showcase it as concrete evidence during their presentation. The audience will be directly engaged visualising and understanding the practical use of the physical and non-physical assets of data. It will be an interactive and participatory debate through use of a variety of communication tools (before, during and after the auditorium). The organisers will get input through e-consultations, social media use... before the event and will get feedback from the various publications on specific cases and tools to improve data use for agriculture and nutrition. This information will be shared in the EDD website and through the various organisers’ platforms.
Utilisation of the EDD15 App prior to your session: 
We will use a combination of e-mails and social media to promote the event and get feedback on key questions to be discussed. We will design a communication strategy which will support the organisation of the event before, during and after the EDD session. We will then define what content do we want to share with the audience, what is the best social network. We will also share relevant videos.
Utilisation of the EDD15 App during your session: 
We will use the social media to get questions and feedback during the auditorium debate.
Question 1: 
Have ICTs changed the way your organisations works ?
Question 2: 
Examples on data access and data usage which could support achievements of SDG
Communication
Engaging with mass media: 
Yes
Press-related activities: 
Yes
Focal point for press activities - Organisation(s): 
First name: 
Yentyl
Last name: 
Williams
Organisation: 
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
First name: 
Stephanie
Last name: 
Crockett
Organisation: 
The World Bank Group
Social Media: 
Using @ctabruxelles @ctaflash as the main twitter handles to promote discussion on the aforementioned topics concerning agriculture and data; link with key stakeholders Using CTA Brussels and CTA facebook to continue the social media conversation and create synergies amongst the difference social media fora Using existing twitter hashtags on the subject #agriculture #opendata Build on existing social media campaign following on from CTA Brussels Briefing No.40 on data and agriculture
Focal point(s) for social media - Organisation(s): 
Organisation: 
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
First name: 
Yentyl
Last name: 
Williams
Organisation: 
The World Bank Group
First name: 
Stephanie
Last name: 
Crockett
Website
Banner on website: 
Yes
Banner on website for other organisation(s): 
Organisation: 
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
Focal point(s) for website - Organisation(s): 
Organisation: 
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
First name: 
Yentyl
Last name: 
Williams
Newsletters - Organisation(s): 
Organisation: 
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
Submit my content: 
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