Map

5-6 JUNE 2018 / Tour & Taxis / Brussels

EDD gives young people a voice

Angelique Kidjo, world famous Beninese songwriter and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador burst into the room, full of life, humour and positive energy. ‘I like your dress, you’re hot,’ she hailed one of the young leaders. Then it was time to get down to the serious business of how to promote gender equality, and it was the group of EU Young Leaders’ turn to tell her what their passions were.

 

‘Education can transform everything,’ she said in response. ‘You can’t build society if men and women are not equally educated.’ As a Goodwill Ambassador she supports women who fight to change male attitudes. ‘A women shouldn’t be a man’s slave. Patriarchy is based on fear,’ she said. ‘Every second you live make it worth it. Be different, be unique,’ she urged her audience.

 

Her emphasis on education is in tune with the European Union’s International Women’s Day message this past March 8: ‘We are also consistent in all aspects of all our policies, both inside the EU and in our external action by promoting gender equality and women's empowerment. Worldwide, more than 15 million girls of primary school age do not go to school. The EU is helping boost access to education from Africa, Latin America and the Middle East, to South East Asia.’

 

Startling figures on the depth of gender inequality

The figures on the situation of young people, particularly girls, are startling. Gender inequality starts from an early age. Globally, 66 million girls do not go to school, and 33 million fewer girls than boys are in primary school. It is calculated that just one extra year of education would increase a girl’s earning power by 20 %.

 

As young people enter the labour market, 28.3 % of those living in the Middle East and 23.7% in North Africa cannot find work. For young women In the Middle East, only 13.2% of them participate in the labour market, compared to 46.5 % of young men.

 

In North Africa, the female youth participation rate stands at 19.7 % compared to 46.8 % for young males. Figures like these resulted in designating the EDD2018 theme, Women and girls at the centre of sustainable development.

 

The meeting with Angelique Kidjo was the start of a busy two days for the 16 Young Leaders invited by the European Commission to lead the youth cohort pressing for gender equality. This year’s Young Leaders came from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, El Salvador, Ghana, India, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, the Republic of Congo, Sudan, Sweden, Syria, and Uganda. In keeping with this year’s theme, 12 were women, and four were men. Over the last four years, 39 girls and 24 boys have been chosen from more than 40 countries.

 

Young Leaders driving gender equality

One of the key events focusing on youth was the High-Level Panel, Young Leaders Driving Gender Equality, where leading political figures were paired with the young leaders who described personal initiatives to push forward gender equality in education (Guinea), economic empowerment (Afghanistan), gender-based violence (Jordan), politics (Denmark) and youth inclusion (Swaziland).

 

Speaker Nondumiso Hlohe (Swaziland) again stressed education as the key: ‘It has a multiplier effect as we hold up more than half the sky.’ For Farhad Wajdi (Afghanistan) war was the factor that had destroyed the possibility of change.

 

At a packed session on Youth as Key Actors for Change on the second day, the participants, 80 % of whom were under 30, insisted that young people are certainly the key to change, as they bring new ideas and perspectives, as well as an ability to think outside the box and reflect future needs. With their modern education and access to and embracing of new technology they are very good at networking, and are the ones to create intergenerational dialogue.

 

Is development dead? They asked provocatively. No, but it needs to be restructured, and young people are the ones to do this, they concluded.

 

Meeting Queen Letizia of Spain

One high point for the Young Leaders was meeting Queen Letizia of Spain. As a former journalist, Queen Letizia quickly developed a rapport, and youth leaders were enthusiastic and inspired.

 

‘She has a presence and gave helpful advice – telling us that we should keep up our work, and as EU Young Leaders; it is our responsibility to bring about change,’ said one. ‘In my country I don’t get to speak to people about what I’m doing, but here I get to speak to the Queen of an important European country. She has an amazing vision for young people,’ said another.

 

Young people in the Global Village

A tour of the Global Village clearly showcased the focus on women and girls. Some organisations were advocates for women and the environment, such as ‘Women engage for a common future’, which has built up by a youth group to work on fulfilling the Paris Agreement on cutting emissions, while in Latin America women are working for sustainable development and water conservation. A stand advocating gender-sensitive coffee explained that in Uganda women do 90 % of the work picking the coffee, while men, who own the land reap the financial rewards.

 

While many of the European Development Days stands emphasised the importance of ensuring that women as agricultural entrepreneurs get a fair deal, one could see a growing emphasis on women in the digital economy. This reflects back to the point made in the session on Young People as Agents for Change. New technology can be an important aid for change, so it is important that girls as well as boys are introduced to it as early as possible.

 

‘Stay committed to the long haul’: Danish Crown Princess Mary

A visit by Mary, the Crown Princess of Denmark, to meet the Young Leaders in the Youth Lounge at the end of the conference, summed up the emphasis on young people as the engine of change. Having listened to their stories, Crown Princess Mary was asked for her advice, and she responded that one had to ‘stay committed’ as change takes a long time, and one needs to prove one’s credibility.

 

She also stressed the importance of building coalitions. ‘You can’t do it alone, you need to take people with you,’ she advised. This is perhaps the main message Young Leaders will take from EDD2018.

 

 

EDD gives young people a voice

EDD gives young people a voice

Angelique Kidjo, world famous Beninese songwriter and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador burst into the room, full of life, humour and positive energy. ‘I like your dress, you’re hot,’ she hailed one of the young leaders. Then it was time to get down to the serious business of how to promote gender equality, and it was the group of EU Young Leaders’ turn to tell her what their passions were.

 

‘Education can transform everything,’ she said in response. ‘You can’t build society if men and women are not equally educated.’ As a Goodwill Ambassador she supports women who fight to change male attitudes. ‘A women shouldn’t be a man’s slave. Patriarchy is based on fear,’ she said. ‘Every second you live make it worth it. Be different, be unique,’ she urged her audience.

 

Her emphasis on education is in tune with the European Union’s International Women’s Day message this past March 8: ‘We are also consistent in all aspects of all our policies, both inside the EU and in our external action by promoting gender equality and women's empowerment. Worldwide, more than 15 million girls of primary school age do not go to school. The EU is helping boost access to education from Africa, Latin America and the Middle East, to South East Asia.’

 

Startling figures on the depth of gender inequality

The figures on the situation of young people, particularly girls, are startling. Gender inequality starts from an early age. Globally, 66 million girls do not go to school, and 33 million fewer girls than boys are in primary school. It is calculated that just one extra year of education would increase a girl’s earning power by 20 %.

 

As young people enter the labour market, 28.3 % of those living in the Middle East and 23.7% in North Africa cannot find work. For young women In the Middle East, only 13.2% of them participate in the labour market, compared to 46.5 % of young men.

 

In North Africa, the female youth participation rate stands at 19.7 % compared to 46.8 % for young males. Figures like these resulted in designating the EDD2018 theme, Women and girls at the centre of sustainable development.

 

The meeting with Angelique Kidjo was the start of a busy two days for the 16 Young Leaders invited by the European Commission to lead the youth cohort pressing for gender equality. This year’s Young Leaders came from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, El Salvador, Ghana, India, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, the Republic of Congo, Sudan, Sweden, Syria, and Uganda. In keeping with this year’s theme, 12 were women, and four were men. Over the last four years, 39 girls and 24 boys have been chosen from more than 40 countries.

 

Young Leaders driving gender equality

One of the key events focusing on youth was the High-Level Panel, Young Leaders Driving Gender Equality, where leading political figures were paired with the young leaders who described personal initiatives to push forward gender equality in education (Guinea), economic empowerment (Afghanistan), gender-based violence (Jordan), politics (Denmark) and youth inclusion (Swaziland).

 

Speaker Nondumiso Hlohe (Swaziland) again stressed education as the key: ‘It has a multiplier effect as we hold up more than half the sky.’ For Farhad Wajdi (Afghanistan) war was the factor that had destroyed the possibility of change.

 

At a packed session on Youth as Key Actors for Change on the second day, the participants, 80 % of whom were under 30, insisted that young people are certainly the key to change, as they bring new ideas and perspectives, as well as an ability to think outside the box and reflect future needs. With their modern education and access to and embracing of new technology they are very good at networking, and are the ones to create intergenerational dialogue.

 

Is development dead? They asked provocatively. No, but it needs to be restructured, and young people are the ones to do this, they concluded.

 

Meeting Queen Letizia of Spain

One high point for the Young Leaders was meeting Queen Letizia of Spain. As a former journalist, Queen Letizia quickly developed a rapport, and youth leaders were enthusiastic and inspired.

 

‘She has a presence and gave helpful advice – telling us that we should keep up our work, and as EU Young Leaders; it is our responsibility to bring about change,’ said one. ‘In my country I don’t get to speak to people about what I’m doing, but here I get to speak to the Queen of an important European country. She has an amazing vision for young people,’ said another.

 

Young people in the Global Village

A tour of the Global Village clearly showcased the focus on women and girls. Some organisations were advocates for women and the environment, such as ‘Women engage for a common future’, which has built up by a youth group to work on fulfilling the Paris Agreement on cutting emissions, while in Latin America women are working for sustainable development and water conservation. A stand advocating gender-sensitive coffee explained that in Uganda women do 90 % of the work picking the coffee, while men, who own the land reap the financial rewards.

 

While many of the European Development Days stands emphasised the importance of ensuring that women as agricultural entrepreneurs get a fair deal, one could see a growing emphasis on women in the digital economy. This reflects back to the point made in the session on Young People as Agents for Change. New technology can be an important aid for change, so it is important that girls as well as boys are introduced to it as early as possible.

 

‘Stay committed to the long haul’: Danish Crown Princess Mary

A visit by Mary, the Crown Princess of Denmark, to meet the Young Leaders in the Youth Lounge at the end of the conference, summed up the emphasis on young people as the engine of change. Having listened to their stories, Crown Princess Mary was asked for her advice, and she responded that one had to ‘stay committed’ as change takes a long time, and one needs to prove one’s credibility.

 

She also stressed the importance of building coalitions. ‘You can’t do it alone, you need to take people with you,’ she advised. This is perhaps the main message Young Leaders will take from EDD2018.

 

 

EDD gives young people a voice

EDD gives young people a voice

EDD gives young people a voice

Angelique Kidjo, world famous Beninese songwriter and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador burst into the room, full of life, humour and positive energy. ‘I like your dress, you’re hot,’ she hailed one of the young leaders. Then it was time to get down to the serious business of how to promote gender equality, and it was the group of EU Young Leaders’ turn to tell her what their passions were.

 

‘Education can transform everything,’ she said in response. ‘You can’t build society if men and women are not equally educated.’ As a Goodwill Ambassador she supports women who fight to change male attitudes. ‘A women shouldn’t be a man’s slave. Patriarchy is based on fear,’ she said. ‘Every second you live make it worth it. Be different, be unique,’ she urged her audience.

 

Her emphasis on education is in tune with the European Union’s International Women’s Day message this past March 8: ‘We are also consistent in all aspects of all our policies, both inside the EU and in our external action by promoting gender equality and women's empowerment. Worldwide, more than 15 million girls of primary school age do not go to school. The EU is helping boost access to education from Africa, Latin America and the Middle East, to South East Asia.’

 

Startling figures on the depth of gender inequality

The figures on the situation of young people, particularly girls, are startling. Gender inequality starts from an early age. Globally, 66 million girls do not go to school, and 33 million fewer girls than boys are in primary school. It is calculated that just one extra year of education would increase a girl’s earning power by 20 %.

 

As young people enter the labour market, 28.3 % of those living in the Middle East and 23.7% in North Africa cannot find work. For young women In the Middle East, only 13.2% of them participate in the labour market, compared to 46.5 % of young men.

 

In North Africa, the female youth participation rate stands at 19.7 % compared to 46.8 % for young males. Figures like these resulted in designating the EDD2018 theme, Women and girls at the centre of sustainable development.

 

The meeting with Angelique Kidjo was the start of a busy two days for the 16 Young Leaders invited by the European Commission to lead the youth cohort pressing for gender equality. This year’s Young Leaders came from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, El Salvador, Ghana, India, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, the Republic of Congo, Sudan, Sweden, Syria, and Uganda. In keeping with this year’s theme, 12 were women, and four were men. Over the last four years, 39 girls and 24 boys have been chosen from more than 40 countries.

 

Young Leaders driving gender equality

One of the key events focusing on youth was the High-Level Panel, Young Leaders Driving Gender Equality, where leading political figures were paired with the young leaders who described personal initiatives to push forward gender equality in education (Guinea), economic empowerment (Afghanistan), gender-based violence (Jordan), politics (Denmark) and youth inclusion (Swaziland).

 

Speaker Nondumiso Hlohe (Swaziland) again stressed education as the key: ‘It has a multiplier effect as we hold up more than half the sky.’ For Farhad Wajdi (Afghanistan) war was the factor that had destroyed the possibility of change.

 

At a packed session on Youth as Key Actors for Change on the second day, the participants, 80 % of whom were under 30, insisted that young people are certainly the key to change, as they bring new ideas and perspectives, as well as an ability to think outside the box and reflect future needs. With their modern education and access to and embracing of new technology they are very good at networking, and are the ones to create intergenerational dialogue.

 

Is development dead? They asked provocatively. No, but it needs to be restructured, and young people are the ones to do this, they concluded.

 

Meeting Queen Letizia of Spain

One high point for the Young Leaders was meeting Queen Letizia of Spain. As a former journalist, Queen Letizia quickly developed a rapport, and youth leaders were enthusiastic and inspired.

 

‘She has a presence and gave helpful advice – telling us that we should keep up our work, and as EU Young Leaders; it is our responsibility to bring about change,’ said one. ‘In my country I don’t get to speak to people about what I’m doing, but here I get to speak to the Queen of an important European country. She has an amazing vision for young people,’ said another.

 

Young people in the Global Village

A tour of the Global Village clearly showcased the focus on women and girls. Some organisations were advocates for women and the environment, such as ‘Women engage for a common future’, which has built up by a youth group to work on fulfilling the Paris Agreement on cutting emissions, while in Latin America women are working for sustainable development and water conservation. A stand advocating gender-sensitive coffee explained that in Uganda women do 90 % of the work picking the coffee, while men, who own the land reap the financial rewards.

 

While many of the European Development Days stands emphasised the importance of ensuring that women as agricultural entrepreneurs get a fair deal, one could see a growing emphasis on women in the digital economy. This reflects back to the point made in the session on Young People as Agents for Change. New technology can be an important aid for change, so it is important that girls as well as boys are introduced to it as early as possible.

 

‘Stay committed to the long haul’: Danish Crown Princess Mary

A visit by Mary, the Crown Princess of Denmark, to meet the Young Leaders in the Youth Lounge at the end of the conference, summed up the emphasis on young people as the engine of change. Having listened to their stories, Crown Princess Mary was asked for her advice, and she responded that one had to ‘stay committed’ as change takes a long time, and one needs to prove one’s credibility.

 

She also stressed the importance of building coalitions. ‘You can’t do it alone, you need to take people with you,’ she advised. This is perhaps the main message Young Leaders will take from EDD2018.

 

 

EDD gives young people a voice