7-8 JUNE 2017 / Tour & Taxis / Brussels

Leveraging political consensus on promoting resilience through post-crisis recovery

Leveraging political consensus on promoting resilience through post-crisis recovery

EDD17 - Replay - Leveraging political consensus on promoting resilience through post-crisis recovery

auditorium
A3
Thursday, June 8, 2017 -
14:30 to 16:00

Key points

  • Disasters are increasing in frequency and intensity. Recovery processes have to more effective and efficient.
     
  • The recovery process is an opportunity to address risks, reduce vulnerabilities and strengthen resilience.
     
  • The real challenge is that the hazards are increasing through climate change.
     
  • US$50 trillion investment is planned in infrastructure by 2050 and all of it must be resilient.
     
  • The scope of the European Commission approach to resilience is being expanded to cope with different type of risks and pressures.

Synopsis

Eight hundred practitioners attended the World Reconstruction Conference 3 about resilience and reconstruction. The conference’s conclusions were presented at EDD 2017 to give the European Commission the opportunity to discuss a strategic approach to resilience.

The recovery process after a disaster is a time to address risks, reduce vulnerabilities and strengthen resilience for the future. As disasters and other crises continue to increase in frequency and intensity, it becomes even more necessary to develop effective and efficient recovery processes.

A positive trend has been observed over the past decade in building capacities for managing recovery as an increasing number of governments are developing policies and institutional mechanisms, formulating recovery guidelines and finding internal resources for recovery.

This positive development supports Priority 4 of the Sendai Framework, which set the world on a clear path for enhanced disaster resilience. The Action Plan, covering a five-year period, is the basis for a disaster-risk-informed approach to policymaking.

Today’s challenge is the implementation of all of the Sendai priorities. Only political will can make this happen.

However, it is necessary to pay greater attention to institutional and financial aspects of recovery, developing tools and methodologies to strengthen this practice further and maintain the commitment of national governments and the international community to dedicate resources and efforts.

The partnership with local actors must be improved. It is always local people who respond first. It is important to help locals to help themselves. They must be equipped with the appropriate resources.

Institutional and financial systems are important, but funding is vital. There is always a gap. Resources are limited. There is a need for more flexible instruments. Donors now have to work together in smart ways and mobilise domestic resources.

Huge progress been made in the Sendai Priority 4 on the strengthening of preparedness. Early warning systems are improving, even for earthquakes. The real challenge is that the hazards are increasing through climate change.

Infrastructure investment of US$50 trillion is planned by 2050, all of which must be resilient. This is a huge opportunity to channel investment towards resilience.

The scope of the European Commission approach to resilience is being expanded to cope with different type of risks and pressures and to make EU external action more responsive, flexible and efficient. Programmes have to be country-owned and country-led. Building resilience is not easy. The issue involves all sectors and all government departments.

It is particularly important to strengthen resilience in urban areas where a lack of planning can expose citizens to great risk.

More than just build new roads, today it is necessary to ensure that the socio-economic context is re-established to make the economy sustainable over time. It is necessary to support SMEs within 30 days or else they will go under.

Disasters are not inevitable, but they are not going away soon. The sobering fact is that headline disasters account for less than10 % of the more frequent events that don’t make the news.

Insight

Climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of disasters. Recovery has to be properly planned so that socio-economic life can be resumed.

Organised by

  • Moderator
    Nigel Fisher
    Former Assistant Secretary General, United Nations
  • Zainab S. Ahmed
    Honorable Minister of State, Ministry of Budget and National Planning,
    Government of Nigeria
  • Robert Glasser
    Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) for Disaster Risk Reduction
    United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Viwanou Gnassounou
    Assistant Secretary General
    African, Caribbean and Pacific Secretariat
  • Suman Kumar
    EDD Young Leader, Nepal
  • Neven Mimica
    Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development
    European Commission
  • Barbara Pesce Monteiro
    Director
    United Nations Representation Office Brussels
  • Sameh Wahba
    Director, DRM and Resilience
    World Bank Group
  • Wade Warren
    Acting Administrator
    United States Agency for International Development
Photo gallery

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